Active Days Out

Private or Group Canal Boat Trips

Bite sized history and humour that’s ready when you are

The best sixty minutes of rib-tickling historic escapism you’ll find in Skipton. Our canal trip promises you a guided tour that’s fun whatever the weather with the finest countryside views you can get without moving your feet.

Your guide for the canal tour is award-winning comedian Dave Spikey of Phoenix Nights and 8 out of 10 Cats fame. With his characteristic Northern patter, Dave takes you on a whistle-stop tour of Skipton and canal history that’s refreshingly different to your average commentary.

Our lively canal trip proves you don’t have to let planning or nasty weather get in the way of a good time. Just check when our next boat leaves from our regular departures and let us know you’re coming. Call Lucy and Nick on 01756 790829 now to reserve your seats.

www.CanalTrips.co.uk

Pennine Cruises

Pennine Cruisers provides everything that is needed and whether you are an absolute beginner or an experienced boater you will find it at Pennine Cruisers.
They offer anything from 30 minute accompanied canal trips up the historic Springs Branch to see Skipton Castle from a different angle to day boats hire. They also have the boat yard, dry dock and maintenance services available.
What could be better than sailing slowly along this picturesque waterway, stopping off at one of the many waterside inns, but knowing that you are never more than a few yards from dry land!Pennine Cruisers

Snaygill Boats

Take a top quality Yorkshire canal holiday on the beautiful Leeds Liverpool canal with Snaygill Boats. Really good canal holidays for everyone depend on a lot of things like first class boats on a quiet canal. Started back in the 70′s, Snaygill Boats of Skipton has a fleet of Narrowboats for hire from Daily, Weekly and Short Break holidays. We are a family run business who cares about your holiday. All our boats are fitted to a high specification with modern kitchens and bathrooms. With secure on-site car parking, no fuel surcharge and pets welcome free of charge.

Snaygill Boats

Embsay Steam Railway

Travel between Embsay station, built in 1888, and the new award-winning station at Bolton Abbey. Your journey takes you through picturesque Yorkshire Dales scenery. Bolton Abbey station is the ideal stopping off point for a pleasant one and a half mile walk to the ruins of the 12th Century priory. Venture a little further to picnic on the banks of the River Wharfe, or in the shade of Strid Wood where you will find the Cavendish Pavillion for refreshments.

Embsay Steam Railway

Keighley and Worth Valley Railway

Travel back in Time on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway. Britain’s last remaining complete heritage branch line runs from Keighley to Oxenhope, along a rich seam of West Yorkshire’s rail and cultural heritage. Travel via Ingrow, with its award-winning Museum of Rail Travel, and Damems, the country’s smallest complete station (Ormston in BBC TV’s Born & Bred series) to Oakworth, the location for the classic 1970 The Railway Children film. Get off the train and stretch your legs on The Railway Children Walk linking film locations between Oxenhope, Haworth and Oakworth. Here at the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway there is more to do than at first meets the eye – we’re your route to a great day out for all the ages… So much more than just a train ride.

Keighley and Worth Valley Railway

Settle/Carlisle Railway

Running through some of the most attractive scenery in the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbrian Fells, the Settle-Carlisle railway is equally famous for its Victorian architecture – huge stone viaducts, long tunnels, and remote wayside station buildings.

http://www.settle-carlisle.co.uk/

Settle/Carlisle Railway

Ribblehead Viaduct

It is an iconic, 24-arched viaduct and a Grade II-listed building on the Settle and Carlisle Railway.
The stone arches of this 400-metre long viaduct rise 32 metres above Batty Moor.

Constructing the Settle Carlisle Railway was a massive engineering feat. 35 miles of its 72-mile length lie within the Yorkshire Dales National Park. It opened in 1876 and was the last railway to be built in Britain using almost all manual labour. It took 6,000 men seven years to build and many thousands of ‘navvies’ died during its construction, either from industrial injuries or small pox.

Many of the workers lived at the Ribblehead construction site which is still well-preserved today. It was the first such construction camp in the country to be archeologically surveyed and scheduled as an ancient monument.

3 Peaks Challenge

The Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge takes in the peaks of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside and Ingleborough, usually in this order, and in under 12 hours. These peaks form part of the Pennine range, and encircle the head of the valley of the River Ribble, in the Yorkshire Dales National Park.Although walkers will often not be too far from civilisation, this long walk is still demanding, and is not a way marked route. Map and compass skills will be required, especially when navigating over the Moss, and on the summits if visibility is poor. The total climb is some 5,200 feet, and the footpaths can be very wet and boggy in some places, rugged and rocky in others. Some sections are on fast country roads.This walking challenge makes excellent training for bigger and longer challenges, such as the national Three Peaks of Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon.

3 Peaks Challenge

Country Walks

There is something to suit every type of walker. Whether you’re content with a short stroll in flip-flops or happy donning hiking boots and marching across the fells from trig point to trig point, this stunningly beautiful area can meet all your needs. The variety of walking in the Dales is wide. Regardless of age, fitness level or experience, you will not have a problem finding a distance and a type of walk to suit you. “Craven Walkers” have some great ideas in their book “Walks for Health in Skipton”.

The Millennium Walk

Whether a local, a regular visitor, or a tourist, you’ll discover some interesting aspect of Skipton that you did know before your walk.

The Skipton Millennium Walk pays attention to details of the High Street that may have escaped your attention. Features such as the base of the long removed Market Cross, or the Bull Baiting Stone, or the Vicars Paving.

The Millennium Walk

Local Gardens of Renown

Broughton Hall

The historic Broughton Hall Estate, near Skipton, is situated in some of the most stunning countryside in Yorkshire and is set within 3,000 acres of secure and extensive landscaped grounds.

The Hall is let out for events and functions. Also situated centrally within the restored Walled Garden (by Dan Pearson) is the prestigious contemporary UTOPIA (by Sir Michael Hopkins).

Broughton Hall

Newby Hall and Gardens

Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, with some of Britain’s finest Robert Adam interiors Newby Hall is home to a wonderful collection of Chippendale furniture, Gobelins tapestries and classical statuary. With 25 acres of award winning gardens including one of Europe’s largest double herbaceous borders, an enchanting woodland walk and a miniature railway, younger visitors will also enjoy the exciting adventure gardens.

Newby Hall Gardens

Harewood House

There are over 100 acres of Gardens at Harewood. They are full of variety, with plants from all over the world – all this in the setting of a magnificent landscape created by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown.

Children will enjoy the excitement and thrills of the Adventure Playground, with its slides, swings and climbing frames – all with the café, picnic areas, ice cream kiosk and toilets close by.

You can also enjoy Harewood’s famous Bird Garden, home to more than 90 species, including penguins, owls, flamingos and parrots.

Harewood House

Lambing Experience

At the “Thornton Farm” you can enjoy the sight of lambing sheep and the calving cows (seasonal) from their purpose-built educational viewing gallery.

www.ThorntonHallCountryPark.co.uk

Hesketh Farm Park

This is an amazing farm attraction situated at Bolton Abbey near Skipton in the beautiful Yorkshire Dales. With a great combination of extremely friendly animals, huge indoor fun & play area, for those wet days and with lots of outdoor play, paddocks and rides too.

Hesketh Farm

White Scar Caves

White Scar Cave is a show cave beneath White Scars just outside Ingleton in the Yorkshire Dales.
Visitors to the caves walk through an artificially enlarged fissure to meet a natural stream passage – containing underground waterfalls, stalactites, stalagmites, flowstones and other natural limestone formations. Finally, a recently excavated tunnel and walkway brings visitors to the impressive Battlefield Chamber, a huge boulder-strewn cavern which was formed by glacial flood waters during the last ice age.

White Scar Caves

Stump Cross Caverns

Stump Cross Caverns near Grassington in Yorkshire is one of the country’s leading show caves, and one of the few that actually encourages cavers to explore and extend it. The cave was discovered accidentally by two lead miners working near Stubbe or Stump Cross in 1858, William and Mark Newbold.

The superb range of stalactites and stalagmites, unusual rock formations and spectacular lighting with level pathways all go to make a descent into the caves an unforgettable experience for people of all ages. Sparkling stalactites and stalagmites add an extra ingredient to the water sculpted rock walls of the cave, and scientists have found a way to tell how old they are.

Stump Cross Caverns

Golf

Skipton Golf Club is set amidst the Yorkshire Dales between Airedale and Wharfedale. Playing the course, you are treated to magnificent views of Sharphaw, Crookrise and Embsay Crag. Eller Beck, a superb feature of the course descends from the surrounding fells and meanders through the back nine holes, providing an interesting water hazard.
Visitors are guaranteed a warm and friendly welcome and will enjoy challenging golf in the natural surroundings of the Yorkshire Dales. Many return on an annual basis to play in the Club’s very popular Open Events.Skipton Golf Club

Fishing

Fishing is a popular sport in Yorkshire. As you would expect, its broad canals and winding rivers teem with trout, grayling, salmon and eels as well as the expected roach, perch, pike and chub. There can be nothing better than spending a day in Yorkshire’s stunning countryside waiting for a fish to bite.

Kilnsey Park

Mountain biking

The Yorkshire cycle route passes close by the River Aire and is suitable for all levels of cyclists – serious and leisure. The towpath of the Calder & Hebble Navigation forms part of the Calder Valley Cycleway and cycling along the towpath of the Selby Canal is a real joy. Part of the Trans Pennine Trail runs alongside Yorkshire’s River Ouse.

Bolton Abbey

Bolton Abbey is in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales on the banks of the River Wharfe. With just under 30,000 acres of beautiful countryside, over 80 miles of footpaths and ample space to run around and enjoy the fresh air, there is something for all ages. Explore the ruins of the Priory and discover a landscape full of history and legend, wander along the riverside, woodland and moorland paths, enjoy local produce in the excellent restaurants, tea rooms and cafes, treat yourself in the quality gift shops and food shop or simply relax beside the river with a picnic whilst the children play.

Bolton Abbey

Malham Cove

It is a huge curving amphitheatre shaped cliff formation of limestone rock.
The vertical face of the cliff is about 260 feet high. The top of the cove is a large area of deeply eroded limestone pavement, of a strange pattern rarely seen in England. The majesty of Malham Cove looks out over the Village of Malham and has been attracting visitors for centuries. Shown in many productions with latest been “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows” and “The Trip” shown on BBC2.

Malham Dale

Mastiles Lane and Malham Tarn walk with Kilnsey Crag

This is the perfect winter walk for much of it is done on good solid paths. The first 5 miles from Kilnsey to Malham Tarn follows the noted Mastiles Lane Drovers Road which has been used since before Roman times as there is the site of a Roman marching camp on the drove road. At the end of the road Malham Tarn is reached. A popular Yorkshire Dales attraction, Malham Tarn is 375 metres above sea level and a relaxing place to be. After enjoying the surroundings of the tarn the walk leaves to cross classic dales fells over High Cote Moor. Look out for spectacular hidden waterfalls at Cote Gill before descending to Arncliffe Cote. Then follow quiet roads to Kilnsey and walk closely past the famous Kilnsey Crag. The Crag, popular with rock climbers will attract your eyes. It is an imposing finish to a great walk